White Lake Area History Archives
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White Lake Area Resorts

 

Albumar Resort
Albumar Resort

The last remaining historic location on White Lake and the site of the original Charles Mears water-powered saw mill and millpond during the mid to late 1800s. In the 1890’s, the property was sold, the old mill building remodeled, and the millpond dam rebuilt.

Once the mill boarding house for the Charles Mears mill, the Albumar Hotel was opened as a resort by Alfred Burland in the late 1890s. It is believed that the name “Albunmar” is the combination of Alfred’s first and last name, and his wife Martha: ALfred – BUrland – MARtha. Alfred Burland married Martha Hueston in 1871 and they had three sons: Earle H. (1872-1899), Edgar Putnam (1874-1948) and Verne Robert (1878-1937). Alfred died in 1910; his wife Martha died two years prior in 1908. Their son Robert took over the operation of the resort. The rates in 1913 were $8.00 to $12.00 per week with special rates for families for the season.

Albumar was the first resort in the White Lake area to be electrified, power being generated by the waterfall. Guests were attracted to the site because they could keep their boats anchored in the protected area by the point. The grounds of the property were converted into a playground where guests could play croquette, tether ball and tennis.
 

Belleview Resort

Belleview Resort

Belleview Resort

Belleview Resort

Belleview Resort

Belleview Resort

Belleview Resort Dock

Belleview Resort

In June 1890, W. C. Wiege was putting the finishing touches on his new summer resort in Whitehall on the shores of White Lake. There were eleven sleeping apartments, some of them double ones. A space in the attic supplied with cots could also be used in case of over crowing. “Belleview Family Summer Resort” offered fine fishing, rowing, bathing and excellent mineral spring water. During its first season, the guests numbered as high as eighty-nine and as low as twenty-five.

Mrs. Elizabeth Sickenberger was mentioned next in connection with Belleview as a source of mineral spring water which was being collected, bottled and sold by her in 1894.

In March 1900, it was reported that Fred Sadler had leased the property for the coming season. A large bath house was one of the improvements to be made. On June 9, 1900, a grand opening celebration was held. The Str. Carrie Ryerson brought people from Muskegon; the Steamers Eleanor and Cayuga brought people from both of the local villages. Beerman’s band furnished the music. There was dancing on the pavilion and refreshments.

Mrs. C. U. Smith took over as proprietor of Belleview in 1902 with the help of her nephew M.A. Lundell. She operated the resort until she retired in 1936. Although she operated it for a long time, there did not appear to be a lot on news about it in the local newspapers.

There were several quick successions of owners between 1936 and 1945. It was sold to Harry Hyslop of Oak Park, Illinois, in 1936 who renamed the resort “Oak Park Shores”. During his ownership, Mr. Hyslop erected several new cottages. In 1937, Mr. & Mrs. Otto Frye and Mr. & Mrs. Julius Honegger were identified as the new owners. Miss Elsa L. Christie took over the operations of the resort in 1938, and named it Belleview Shores, in recognition of the previous owners.

In 1945, Franklin Lundell, son of M. A. Lundell, his wife, and his brother-in-law Alfred Gara & his wife became the owners of Belleview resort. By 1948, Belleview consisted of 16 rooms and 4 cottages. Several improvements were made to the property, including a concrete stairway to the beach. Due to lack of information in the local newspapers, it is unclear exactly how long the Belleview Resort continued to operate.

 

Bonne Vista Resort

Bonne Vista Resort

Bonne Vista Resort

Bonne Vista Resort

Bonne Vista Resort


Bonne Vista Resort 1930s Post Card

 

In 1890, Joseph Hagreen and H. E. Potter started working together to make preparation for the accommodations of summer resorters at their fruit farms.

Mr. Potter’s large house had been furnished for sleeping apartments and Mr. Hagreen’s table provided sumptuous meals. A dock was built for a ferry landing.

In February 1894, the Hagreen farm house caught fire and burned, so they moved into one of the houses on the Potter farm. In 1897, the Hagreens left the farm and moved to a house in town. Mrs. Hagreen died in August 1898 and Joseph Hagreen died in July 1900. In 1903, Howard E. Potter built a couple of cottages for the summer resorters. He continued operating Bonne Vista until his death in May 1930.


1930s Bonne Vista Brochure

After her husband’s death, Ella Robinson Potter continued to operate the resort with the aid of her son Arthur, until his death in 1938. Then she and her daughter-in-law Eva continued. Ella Potter died in 1939. In 1941, daughter-in-law Eve Potter married Fred Peterson and together they continued the operation of Bonne Vista.

Bonne Vista had 8 guest rooms and 3 housekeeping apartment and they served meals. In 1961, Potter’s Putters, a mini golf course was added. Mrs. Eva Peterson died in 1983. Her son Robert and his wife Jean continued the family tradition and ran the resort until Robert’s death in 1998. His wife Jean remained at Bonne Vista where she enjoyed crocheting and spending time with her family until her death in 2009.

Cherokee Lodge

Cherokee Lodge

Cherokee Lodge

Cherokee Lodge

Cherokee Lodge

Cherokee Lodge, Reception Room

Cherokee Lodge, Reception Room

Cherokee Lodge, Dining

Cherokee Lodge, Frontage

Cherokee Lodge

Cherokee Lodge was built in the Fall of 1919 by Mac R. Fife, and opened on July 1, 1920, with his son R. A. Fife as proprietor. Constructed mainly of logs and wood, to harmonize with the surroundings, this beautiful summer haven would become known all over.

The three story structure was constructed in a “U” shape with frontage of 100 feet overlooking White Lake on the north side. The north wing of the lodge was 60 feet in length and the south side about 80 feet. Surrounding the entire front and north sides of the building was a screened in porch, 12 feet in width.

The first floor, or main floor, contained a spacious dining room at the south, 40x60 feet, which could accommodate 300 people. At the rear of the dining room was the 22x24 foot kitchen. At the north was a 40x60 living room/lounging room, which included two card rooms and a huge fireplace. Between the dining room and living room was the 20x32 foot lobby/reception area, with the entrance and main stairway.

The second and third floors were the sleeping quarters. There were seventy-four rooms, 10x12 feet, equipped with both hot and cold running water. The hotel also contained five separate bathrooms and five separate lavatories for the convenience of the guests.

During the years of ownership, the Fifes kept pace with changing conditions and modernized the lodge to fit the demands of their trade. They had just recently added several new baths, installed additional sleeping conveniences, as well as did some remodeling and redecorating in preparation for opening the Lodge for the summer on June 10, 1940. However, on June 2, 1940, the Cherokee Lodge was completely destroyed by fire. It was never rebuilt.

 


Catalpa Resort


Catalpa Resort 1912-14 - Mrs. E. Blake, Proprietor

Catalpa Resort on Old Channel Trail

Several names are mentioned in connection with the history of the “Catalpas” and Catalpa Resort. Some of the dates that go with the names seem to overlap, creating a bit of confusion in the timeline.

The first names mentioned with regard to the “Catalpas” were Silas and Jane Gritzner. He was in the real estate business in Chicago and they came to Montague in 1902. They had 2 children: Olivia, born in Chicago in 1900; and a son Charles, born in Montague in 1908. The “Catalpas” was often mentioned in the local newspaper, but it seemed more as a place of personal social gatherings rather than “resort” functions. Information indicates that Silas died in Chicago in 1946 and his wife Jane died in San Diego in 1956. They are both buried in Oak Grove Cemetery in Montague. According to information in her obituary, Montague was her home from 1900 to 1928. She owned the “Catalpas” and built “Sunshine Bungalow” where they lived until going to San Diego from 1938-1956.

Around 1909, Edward Brodbeck and his wife Bertha came to Montague and opened the “Catalpas” as a resort.

In 1914, it is reported that Mrs. E. E. Blake has many guests at her resort the “Catalpas” – a popular resort in the area. In May 1919, it was reported that she had packed up her belongings to return to Chicago due to ill health.

 


Glenn Villa Resort


Christian'sGlennVillaResort

Glenn Villa Resort Viewed From Old Channel Trail, 1940

Glenn Villa

Originally the summer home of H. F. Harvey, it was given the name “Oak Glen”.

In 1913, Dan Christian, his wife Emma, and their son Glenn came to White Lake where they purchased “Oak Glen” and opened their resort which they called Glenn Villa. In 1922, a new cottage and several automobile booths were added.

Mrs. Christian died in 1937.

In 1939, Glenn Villa was leased to Capt. W. Raatz of Bloomington Springs, TN, who operated the resort as a camp for young boys under the name Camp Glenn Villa. The following year he started accepting family group reservations.

Glenn Villa was purchased by John Krauss in 1941. By the mid 1940s, John Strmic and his family were operating the Glenn Villa. Mary Strmic, a daughter who had previously been involved in the running of Glenn Villa, and her husband Elwin Dow announced in 1955 that they would be taking over the operations of Glenn Villa. They also changed the name to El Du Mar Inn. It is unclear how long the El Du Mar Inn was in operation.

 


Idlewild

Idlewild

Idlewild

Idlewild

Lakeside Inn

Murray's Inn

Murray's Inn


Murray's Inn


Murray's Inn


Old Channel Inn
 

Sylvan Beach Hotel

White Lake Villa Glide-in Toboggan
 


White Lake Villa


White Lake Villa

White Lake Villa

White Lake Villa 1927